Analysis: News Use across Social Media Platforms

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It makes sense for each individual journalist’s career to put the bulk of their social media effort into Twitter rather than Facebook. But it makes sense for journalism outlets to have their writers putting the bulk of their social media effort into Facebook rather than Twitter.
Ezra Klein - Why do journalists prefer Twitter to Facebook? - Washington Post
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pewresearch:

See Pew Research President Alan Murray’s presentation on “Journalism in the Digital Age” at George Washington University’s School of Media and Public Affairs.

PS: You can also follow our president, @alansmurray, on Twitter.

This was posted 11 months ago. It has 11 notes.
Pew Research Center: Attention, journalists, media geeks and anyone interested in the changing landscape of the news media

pewresearch:

The Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism sends out a briefing email every morning, highlighting the biggest changes and news in the industry. 

For example, in today’s news: Howard Kurtz and The Daily Beast part ways, Al Jazeera announces plans for a Detroit bureau, Facebook releases “best practices” guide for journalists and Michael Bloomberg may be interested in buying The Financial Times.

Sign up to receive it here so you’ll always know what’s going on.

Sign up | Past daily briefings

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How the data journalism sausage gets made
This was posted 1 year ago. It has 0 notes.

pewresearch:

Four Revenue Success Stories in Newspapers — What’s working? How are they doing it? Can they help save the industry?

Check out the tactics and strategy used by these innovative editors and publishers in our infographic.

Read the full report here

(via pewinternet)

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 23 notes.
brianlucid:

A free, open source reference book on the emerging field of data journalism. 
An international, collaborative effort involving dozens of data journalism’s leading advocates and best practitioners - including from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the BBC, the Chicago Tribune, Deutsche Welle, the Guardian, the Financial Times, Helsingin Sanomat, La Nacion, the New York Times, ProPublica, the Washington Post, the Texas Tribune, Verdens Gang, Wales Online, Zeit Online and many others.

brianlucid:

A free, open source reference book on the emerging field of data journalism. 

An international, collaborative effort involving dozens of data journalism’s leading advocates and best practitioners - including from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, the BBC, the Chicago Tribune, Deutsche Welle, the Guardian, the Financial Times, Helsingin Sanomat, La Nacion, the New York Times, ProPublica, the Washington Post, the Texas Tribune, Verdens Gang, Wales Online, Zeit Online and many others.

(via lifeandcode)

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 11 notes. .
One of the things I tell reporters every day is: When you get to that point of the story, four or five paragraphs in, and [you write] ‘the move comes amid…’ — stop.

Tim Grieve, top editor of Politico Pro, to Nieman Journalism Lab.

He continued: “Anybody who is reading Politico Pro knows what ‘the move comes amid.’ That 300 words of new essential information can be a 300-word story. The traditional approach would be a 1,000-word story, but the second part of that story would be the blah blah blah that everybody already knows…It’s very liberating for reporters, but it’s pretty damn liberating for readers too. No one has time to read stuff they already know. Take your time with the stuff that’s going to grab them by the jacket lapels and say, ‘Whoa, this is new.’”

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I’m wondering if stories like Mike Daisey’s mark a shift in this conversation about attention. The conversation has involved web publishers, advertisers and activists all asking how we compete successfully for small slices of attention. With stories like Daisey’s and Kony 2012, the conversation switches from the practical question of seizing attention to the ethical questions of attention. What’s fair play in demanding attention for a story or for a cause? How far can you simplify a story to gain attention? How much can you speak on someone else’s behalf? Perhaps the reason these conversations get so passionate is that they’re not just about the rules of different professions but about the basic question, “What can someone demand I pay attention to?”
Ethan Zuckerman, The Passion of Mike Daisey: Journalism, Storytelling and the Ethics of Attention
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What the article threshold creates is an odd hybrid — a mass market for advertising, but a niche market for users. This is the commercial equivalent of the National Public Radio model, where sponsors reach all listeners, but direct support only comes from donors. (Lest NPR seem like small ball, it’s worth noting that the Times ‘ has convinced something like one out of every hundred of its online readers to pay, while NPR affiliates’ success rate is something like one in twelve. Newspapers with thresholds now aspire to NPR’s persuasiveness.)

—Clay Shirky, Newspapers, Paywalls, and Core Users

Slowly catching up on my “to-read” list of articles. (Clay Shirky’s essays are always on that list.)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 3 notes.
Journo Ipsum

serendipity Kindle Single future of narrative awesome but what’s the business model Gutenberg parenthesis gamification aggregation right-sizing semipermeable This Week in Review shoot a photo rubber cement, Gardening & War section we will make them pay Dan Fleckner future circulation Clay Shirky reporting advertising we will make them pay 5% corruption. I love the Weather & Opera section digital circulation strategy abundance Storify collaboration Walter Lippmann advertising Aron Pilhofer blog crowdsourcing Chartbeat future of context, WikiLeaks shoot a video Google News Paul Steiger RSS Lucius Nieman Instagram Jay Rosen discuss the other longer Book Review Robin Sloan news.me, recontextualize horse-race coverage link economy hot news doctrine got drudged Jeff Jarvis CPM Demand Media morgue the medium is the message.

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 2 notes.

The original story of Times New Roman’s genesis goes like this: Morison wrote a blistering article in 1929 arguing that Times Old Roman, the font of The Times of London, was dated, clunky, badly printed and in need of help — his help. The paper listened and charged Morison with directing the creation of a new suite of letters. He did, and on Oct. 3, 1943, Times New Roman debuted on the bright white broadsheets of the London daily.

Here’s the problem with this tidy account: Evidence found in 1987 — drawings for letters and corresponding brass plates — suggests that the real father of the font wasn’t a typographer at all, but a wooden boat designer from Boston named William Starling Burgess.

Katherine Eastland traces the secret history of the world’s most popular font, Times New Roman. (via thedailyfeed)

(via laphamsquarterly)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 61 notes.
via PEJ: For Communications Grads, Slight Improvement in a Daunting Job Market

From the post:

The report shows a 2.7% rise in employment from 2009, when 55.5% reported having a full–time job one year after graduation. And 2009 was the worst year in 25 year history of the survey and the first time the rates dropped below 60%.  Lee Becker, the report’s co-author and the director of the Cox Center for International Mass Communication Training and Research at the University of Georgia, didn’t find much good news in the small jump in numbers.

“Any improvement underway is slight,” he said. “Students are in a very challenging market. It is hard to be optimistic.”  Indeed, as recently as 2008, 70.2% of degree recipients reported finding a job within one year.

Also:

In terms of income, 2010 graduates made the most money in cable television ($35,000), web careers ($35,000), and public relations ($32,000) where salaries have been increasing for several years. But graduates taking jobs in weekly newspapers ($25,000), television ($25,400), radio ($27,000) and daily newspaper ($27,500) fared the worst.

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 0 notes.
Journalists are now drowning in documents and data. The tools we have to deal with this are actually pretty primitive.

Jonathan Stray, interactive technology editor for The Associated Press, which won a Knight News Challenge grant to develop data visualization tools so that journalists can find the stories contained in mountains of data and documents.

(via poynterinstitute)

More info about the project here: http://overview.ap.org/

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