Turning a Page, the Joseph Herscher Way (click for interactive):

Joseph Herscher drinks his coffee (1), which pulls a string, which yanks a pencil (2), which tips paintings one by one as the balls roll down. The third ball rolls into a shelving unit (3) and swings a ladle, which pours glycerin from a jug into a cup, which  combines with potassium and combusts. A fuse catches fire and burns,  which releases the pool balls (4) one by one. The fourth ball lands in a hanging green shot glass (5),  which turns on the gas. Meanwhile, The fuse (still burning) ignites the  gas, which boils the liquid and sends steam into a sponge (6), which becomes heavy and tips, sliding a fly swatter (7) up, which releases a ball, which rolls along the top of the books,  knocking the other balls and eventually knocking a Velcro-covered ball.  The weight of the Velcro ball tips a book (8) out of the bookcase, which opens it and allows a small marble to roll out of the book and knock a vase (9) off the table. Headphones (10) are pulled by the vase, which releases an orange glass (11), which rolls along the slanted table, sticks to the tape (12) and yanks a pencil in the computer (13). The screen shuts and the computer falls off the table, which pulls a cable, switching on a hair dryer (14), which annoys the hamster (15). He runs, which causes the cage to tip. The pool ball (16) rolls along the top of the cage and drops, which knocks a baking pan (17) off the table, which pulls the hair dyer with it and causes tape (18) to roll across the table, sticking to, and turning, the front page of the newspaper (19).

From: Who Says Machines Must Be Useful? Man Embraces Useless Machines, and Absurdity Ensues

Turning a Page, the Joseph Herscher Way (click for interactive):

Joseph Herscher drinks his coffee (1), which pulls a string, which yanks a pencil (2), which tips paintings one by one as the balls roll down. The third ball rolls into a shelving unit (3) and swings a ladle, which pours glycerin from a jug into a cup, which combines with potassium and combusts. A fuse catches fire and burns, which releases the pool balls (4) one by one. The fourth ball lands in a hanging green shot glass (5), which turns on the gas. Meanwhile, The fuse (still burning) ignites the gas, which boils the liquid and sends steam into a sponge (6), which becomes heavy and tips, sliding a fly swatter (7) up, which releases a ball, which rolls along the top of the books, knocking the other balls and eventually knocking a Velcro-covered ball. The weight of the Velcro ball tips a book (8) out of the bookcase, which opens it and allows a small marble to roll out of the book and knock a vase (9) off the table. Headphones (10) are pulled by the vase, which releases an orange glass (11), which rolls along the slanted table, sticks to the tape (12) and yanks a pencil in the computer (13). The screen shuts and the computer falls off the table, which pulls a cable, switching on a hair dryer (14), which annoys the hamster (15). He runs, which causes the cage to tip. The pool ball (16) rolls along the top of the cage and drops, which knocks a baking pan (17) off the table, which pulls the hair dyer with it and causes tape (18) to roll across the table, sticking to, and turning, the front page of the newspaper (19).

From: Who Says Machines Must Be Useful? Man Embraces Useless Machines, and Absurdity Ensues

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 4 notes. .
2/3 - Portion of news devoted to international affairs in the first half of 2011 

"In the first half of 2011, foreign events dominated the U.S. news media.  The protests and violence throughout the Middle East and North  Africa—known as the Arab Spring—were  the most covered foreign events, accounting for 17% of the overall  newshole, from January 1-June 30. Other significant stories included the  tsunami and nuclear disaster in Japan (5%) and the death of Osama bin Laden (4%), according to PEJ’s News Coverage Index.” —journalism.org

PS: You can also design your own chart with PEJ’s custom chart creator.

2/3 - Portion of news devoted to international affairs in the first half of 2011 

"In the first half of 2011, foreign events dominated the U.S. news media. The protests and violence throughout the Middle East and North Africa—known as the Arab Spring—were the most covered foreign events, accounting for 17% of the overall newshole, from January 1-June 30. Other significant stories included the tsunami and nuclear disaster in Japan (5%) and the death of Osama bin Laden (4%), according to PEJ’s News Coverage Index.” —journalism.org

PS: You can also design your own chart with PEJ’s custom chart creator.

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 9 notes. .