beatonna:

historicaltimes:

American nurses land in Normandy, 1944

ladies

beatonna:

historicaltimes:

American nurses land in Normandy, 1944

ladies

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 6,665 notes. .
beatonna:

historicaltimes:

An Royal Air Force pilot getting a haircut during a break between missions, Britain, 1942.

now this,
makes me think of this episode of QI where they talk about what accents pilots had in WWII, the idea of the Oxford Scholar RAF Pilot.

beatonna:

historicaltimes:

An Royal Air Force pilot getting a haircut during a break between missions, Britain, 1942.

now this,

makes me think of this episode of QI where they talk about what accents pilots had in WWII, the idea of the Oxford Scholar RAF Pilot.

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 3,593 notes. .
Guiteau was certain he would be caught: “Of course I would be executed, but what of that, when I should become immortal and be talked of by all generations to come?” He borrowed some cash from a friend and spent $10 on a handsome, short-barreled British Bulldog revolver; he thought it would display well in an exhibit on the president’s assassination. He practiced firing into a fence and concluded he was a better marksman than he had thought.
The Stalking of the President - Smithsonian mag (found via Wonkblog’s new “Know More” site)
This was posted 6 months ago. It has 0 notes.

What the White House Looks Like Completely Gutted

In the late ’40s, the executive mansion was in a condemnable state. To save it, everything had to go.

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 0 notes.
Up to 4% of the sand on Normandy's Omaha Beach is made up of shrapnel.

A short piece in the September/October 2012 issue of Archaeology magazine highlights the presence of spherical magnetic shards—remnants of the D-Day operations of World War II—found hidden amongst natural sand grains on the beaches of Normandy. “Up to 4 percent of the sand is made up of this shrapnel,” the article states; however, “waves, storms, and rust will probably wipe this microscopic archaeology from the coast in another hundred years.”

Read more

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 0 notes.
beatonna:

speaking of Fancy Dress parties
Gee whiz it’s like this guy time traveled to Right Now and went on the internet and asked what people think is funny.  Because the answer is bacon, for reasons I know not.
But since he won first prize I guess they were all hip to the future back in ‘94.  1894.

beatonna:

speaking of Fancy Dress parties

Gee whiz it’s like this guy time traveled to Right Now and went on the internet and asked what people think is funny.  Because the answer is bacon, for reasons I know not.

But since he won first prize I guess they were all hip to the future back in ‘94.  1894.

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 1,759 notes. .
Whatever reservations one might still have about its overall quality, I don’t believe there’s much doubt that Wikipedia is the largest, most comprehensive, copiously detailed, stunningly useful encyclopedia in all of human history.

—William Cronon, president of the American Historical Association. Also:

Perhaps most importantly, Wikipedia provides an online home for people interested in histories long marginalized by the traditional academy. The old boundary between antiquarianism and professional history collapses in an online universe where people who love a particular subject can compile and share endless historical resources for its study in ways never possible before. Amateur genealogists have enabled the creation of document databases that quantitative historians of the 1960s could only fantasize. In my own field of environmental history, I’ve long told students that gardens and cooking, which have only recently begun to attract the academic attention they deserve, have been studied for generations by serious antiquarians and amateur scholars (many of them women) whose interests were marginalized by a male-dominated academy. In the wikified world of the Web, it’s no longer possible to police these boundaries of academic respectability, and we may all be the better for it if only we can embrace this new openness without losing the commitment to rigor that the best amateurs and professionals have always shared more than the professionals have generally been willing to admit.

His advice for historians? “If you can’t beat ‘em, join ‘em.”

More: Scholarly Authority in a Wikified World

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 5 notes.
lbjlibrary:

1940: Lady Bird shoots the first film of what we would later call Mrs. Johnson’s Home Movie Collection. She had a degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin, after all. How lucky are we at the LBJ Library to have a First Lady who made her own documentary films?
We’ll post one later today, and you’ll see many more as we move through time. She typically did the narration much later, so you’ll also get to hear her voice describing what she sees as she remembers the people and events she filmed. Stay tuned!
LBJ Library photo 41-6-84. This image may be used free of charge as long as credit is given to the source, the Austin American Statesman. 

lbjlibrary:

1940: Lady Bird shoots the first film of what we would later call Mrs. Johnson’s Home Movie Collection. She had a degree in journalism from the University of Texas at Austin, after all. How lucky are we at the LBJ Library to have a First Lady who made her own documentary films?

We’ll post one later today, and you’ll see many more as we move through time. She typically did the narration much later, so you’ll also get to hear her voice describing what she sees as she remembers the people and events she filmed. Stay tuned!

LBJ Library photo 41-6-84. This image may be used free of charge as long as credit is given to the source, the Austin American Statesman. 

(via ourpresidents)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 107 notes. .
todaysdocument:

From November 28 to December 1, 1943, the “Big Three”—Franklin D.  Roosevelt, Joseph Stalin, and Winston Churchill—met at Teheran, Iran to  discuss the progress of the war and plans for what would become the D-day invasion of June 6, 1944.
Read FDR’s Fireside Chat on Teheran and Cairo Conferences and visit the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum

todaysdocument:

From November 28 to December 1, 1943, the “Big Three”—Franklin D. Roosevelt, Joseph Stalin, and Winston Churchill—met at Teheran, Iran to discuss the progress of the war and plans for what would become the D-day invasion of June 6, 1944.

Read FDR’s Fireside Chat on Teheran and Cairo Conferences and visit the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum


This was posted 2 years ago. It has 167 notes. .
thelibrarianontherun:

Winston Churchill, born today in 1874. 

thelibrarianontherun:

Winston Churchill, born today in 1874. 

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 6 notes. .
ourpresidents:

The CIA is releasing a collection of more than 200 declassified documents provided to the Reagan Administration during the Cold War-The release will include intelligence assessments, high-level memos, and briefing materials provided to the Administration.  Also included are never-before-seen video briefings prepared by the CIA on the Soviet space program, the Andropov succession, the Chernobyl disaster, and the Moscow summit. 
Today, The Reagan Library will host a CIA symposium to discuss how the Reagan Administration used intelligence in making  policies to end the Cold War.  Featured guest speakers include Kenneth Adelman, Former Director, Arms Congrol and Disarmament Agency, and Oleg Kalugin, Former Major General in the Soviet KGB. 
The event is at capacity, but the Reagan Library will be live-streaming the event which starts at 3:30 ET. Watch it here.
Pictured, President Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Gorbachev in Red Square during the Moscow Summit. 5/31/88.
More- Ronald Reagan, Intelligence, and the End of the Cold War

Hey Tumblrers, this is starting in about half an hour. Let me know how it goes!

ourpresidents:

The CIA is releasing a collection of more than 200 declassified documents provided to the Reagan Administration during the Cold War-
The release will include intelligence assessments, high-level memos, and briefing materials provided to the Administration.  Also included are never-before-seen video briefings prepared by the CIA on the Soviet space program, the Andropov succession, the Chernobyl disaster, and the Moscow summit. 

Today, The Reagan Library will host a CIA symposium to discuss how the Reagan Administration used intelligence in making policies to end the Cold War.  Featured guest speakers include Kenneth Adelman, Former Director, Arms Congrol and Disarmament Agency, and Oleg Kalugin, Former Major General in the Soviet KGB. 

The event is at capacity, but the Reagan Library will be live-streaming the event which starts at 3:30 ET. Watch it here.

Pictured, President Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Gorbachev in Red Square during the Moscow Summit. 5/31/88.

More- Ronald Reagan, Intelligence, and the End of the Cold War

Hey Tumblrers, this is starting in about half an hour. Let me know how it goes!

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 245 notes. .

ourpresidents:

The Washington Monument is closed due to cracks in the top from the earthquake.  We’re wondering how they will fix it - will they have to put up scaffolding?  In the meantime, here’s some pictures of the construction and the 100th anniversary with President Truman in attendance.

via US National Archives on Facebook

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 37 notes.

The original story of Times New Roman’s genesis goes like this: Morison wrote a blistering article in 1929 arguing that Times Old Roman, the font of The Times of London, was dated, clunky, badly printed and in need of help — his help. The paper listened and charged Morison with directing the creation of a new suite of letters. He did, and on Oct. 3, 1943, Times New Roman debuted on the bright white broadsheets of the London daily.

Here’s the problem with this tidy account: Evidence found in 1987 — drawings for letters and corresponding brass plates — suggests that the real father of the font wasn’t a typographer at all, but a wooden boat designer from Boston named William Starling Burgess.

Katherine Eastland traces the secret history of the world’s most popular font, Times New Roman. (via thedailyfeed)

(via laphamsquarterly)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 61 notes.
latimes:

Paging Advanced Style: Frenchman Robert Maloubier was an agent in Churchill’s Special Operations Executive, sent behind enemy lines to rout German forces and which, unknown to many French, had a key role in the resistance.

Robert Maloubier likes to tell people he is a retired accountant. That he studied finance in college, that he had a quiet life, that he stopped working at 66.
He can barely get the last words out without a chuckle that pulls up the ends of his bushy white mustache so it curls around his cheekbones.
“Oh, I love doing that,” he says with a satisfied sigh. “Nobody knows about me here.”
The truth is Maloubier, 88, never went to college. It’s also hard to say whether he ever really retired, though he admits that when he turned 80 he had to stop rollerblading and flying his plane.

Our emphasis. The article is full of little gems that we don’t want to give away. Devorah Lauter absolutely kills it with these subtle, amazing asides.
Photo:   Robert Maloubier, at his home in Houilles, France. Credit: Devorah Lauter / For The Times

latimes:

Paging Advanced Style: Frenchman Robert Maloubier was an agent in Churchill’s Special Operations Executive, sent behind enemy lines to rout German forces and which, unknown to many French, had a key role in the resistance.

Robert Maloubier likes to tell people he is a retired accountant. That he studied finance in college, that he had a quiet life, that he stopped working at 66.

He can barely get the last words out without a chuckle that pulls up the ends of his bushy white mustache so it curls around his cheekbones.

“Oh, I love doing that,” he says with a satisfied sigh. “Nobody knows about me here.”

The truth is Maloubier, 88, never went to college. It’s also hard to say whether he ever really retired, though he admits that when he turned 80 he had to stop rollerblading and flying his plane.

Our emphasis. The article is full of little gems that we don’t want to give away. Devorah Lauter absolutely kills it with these subtle, amazing asides.

Photo: Robert Maloubier, at his home in Houilles, France. Credit: Devorah Lauter / For The Times

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 44 notes. .