kottke.org: Tender moments caught on Russian dash cams

jkottke:

Many Russian cars are outfitted with dashboard cameras to protect drivers against insurance fraud. These cameras have caught all sorts of crazy happenings — car accidents, low-flying jets, insurance scam attempts, meteors, and plane crashes

— leading many to believe that Russia is a place where crazy shit pretty much happens constantly.

But Russia’s dash cams have also captured many more tender moments — people hopping out of their cars to help old ladies across the street, looking after little kids who wandered into the street, pushing cars out of snowbanks, etc.

This was posted 11 months ago. It has 77 notes.

1. Mississippi river south of Memphis on the border between Arkansas and Mississippi, taken by Landsat 7 on May 28, 2003. (USGS/NASA)

2. The eastern side of Russia’s Kamchatka Peninsula, taken by Landsat 7 on Feb. 17, 2002. (USGS/NASA)

3. Center pivot irrigation systems in croplands near Garden City, Kansas, taken by Landsat 7 on Sep, 25, 2000. (USGS/NASA)

More: Favorite Images From Landsat’s Amazing 40-Year Record of Earth From Space

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 6 notes.
Atlantic Cities has a nice short post up about dogs riding the metro in Moscow—more particularly, how the dogs use the subway to “optimize” their panhandling, including this:

Alex Marquardt reports in the ABC News article that the cleverness of Moscow’s strays is not limited to commuting.  Indeed, they have been spotted obeying traffic signals (which is more than you can say for the average human pedestrian in New York or Washington) and sometimes sending out “a smaller, cuter member” from a pack, “apparently realizing it will be more successful at begging than its bigger, less attractive counterparts.”

(Also keep in mind that Moscow’s subway system is pretty far underground, so these dogs are clearly adept at using those crazy-long escalators as well.)

I saw lots of packs of dogs in Moscow, but the metro dogs were definitely a cut above. Once, while we were in a station puzzling over our route, we saw a dog hop off an arriving train, trot across to the opposite platform, and lay down to wait for the next one. I guess it’s some sort of consolation that even subway dogs miss their stop sometimes.

Atlantic Cities has a nice short post up about dogs riding the metro in Moscow—more particularly, how the dogs use the subway to “optimize” their panhandling, including this:

Alex Marquardt reports in the ABC News article that the cleverness of Moscow’s strays is not limited to commuting.  Indeed, they have been spotted obeying traffic signals (which is more than you can say for the average human pedestrian in New York or Washington) and sometimes sending out “a smaller, cuter member” from a pack, “apparently realizing it will be more successful at begging than its bigger, less attractive counterparts.”

(Also keep in mind that Moscow’s subway system is pretty far underground, so these dogs are clearly adept at using those crazy-long escalators as well.)
I saw lots of packs of dogs in Moscow, but the metro dogs were definitely a cut above. Once, while we were in a station puzzling over our route, we saw a dog hop off an arriving train, trot across to the opposite platform, and lay down to wait for the next one. I guess it’s some sort of consolation that even subway dogs miss their stop sometimes.
This was posted 1 year ago. It has 2 notes. .
Moscow at Night

Moscow appears at the center of this nighttime image photographed by the Expedition 30 crew aboard the International Space Station, flying at an altitude of approximately 240 miles on March 28, 2012. A solar array panel for the space station is on the left side of the frame. The view is to the north-northwest from a nadir of approximately 49.4 degrees north latitude and 42.1 degrees east longitude, about 100 miles west-northwest of Volgograd. The Aurora Borealis, airglow and daybreak frame the horizon.

Image Credit: NASA
[via]

Moscow at Night

Moscow appears at the center of this nighttime image photographed by the Expedition 30 crew aboard the International Space Station, flying at an altitude of approximately 240 miles on March 28, 2012. A solar array panel for the space station is on the left side of the frame. The view is to the north-northwest from a nadir of approximately 49.4 degrees north latitude and 42.1 degrees east longitude, about 100 miles west-northwest of Volgograd. The Aurora Borealis, airglow and daybreak frame the horizon.

Image Credit: NASA

[via]

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 0 notes. .
aaanastasia:

“Никогда и ничего не просите! Никогда и ничего, и в особенности у тех, кто сильнее вас…”
(quote from Master and Margarita scrawled on the wall of Bulgakov house in Moscow)

aaanastasia:

Никогда и ничего не просите! Никогда и ничего, и в особенности у тех, кто сильнее вас…”

(quote from Master and Margarita scrawled on the wall of Bulgakov house in Moscow)

(Source: jegibbs)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 18 notes. .
today:

Scenes from the Russian election

today:

Scenes from the Russian election

(via wnyc)

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 100 notes. .
Lana Peters, Stalin’s Daughter, Dies at 85 - New York Times

Lana Peters, Stalin’s Daughter, Dies at 85 - New York Times

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 4 notes. .
However, I want to ask directly: Do you all seriously believe those surveys?

Vladimir Putin, in response to a new poll indicating that ‘“the majority of Russians have ‘grown weary’ of waiting for [him] to make positive changes in their lives, and many expect little new from him as he embarks on his second stint as president next year”

[via aaanastasia]

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 2 notes.

Official Takes Puppy as Bribe | News | The Moscow Times

rubenfeld:

Official Takes Puppy as Bribe | News | The Moscow Times

In Russia’s most famous anti-bureaucracy satire from the 19th century, “The Government Inspector,” an official boasts of accepting bribes in puppies, not money.

An official was convicted of the same crime this week.

Army officer Yulai Giniyatov, 27, was found guilty of obtaining various perks from a conscript under his command last year in exchange for passes to leave the unit, Interfax reported Wednesday.

The conscript, Yevgeny Klimentyev, purchased tables and plumbing equipment for Giniyatov’s mechanized infantry company, as well as a laptop and a mobile phone for Giniyatov, Kommersant reported.

He also repaired Giniyatov’s car — and, yes, shelled out 30,000 rubles ($1,000) for a Yorkshire terrier puppy for Giniyatov’s girlfriend.

FINALLY, an [admittedly flimsy] excuse to post this:

Carry on.

This was posted 2 years ago. It has 15 notes.