We're hiring!

pewresearch:

If you love data like we do, come work at the Pew Research Center.

Current open positions:

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 120 notes.
The Spy in the Soda Machine

SAN FRANCISCO — They came in through the Chinese takeout menu.

Unable to breach the computer network at a big oil company, hackers infected with malware the online menu of a Chinese restaurant that was popular with employees. When the workers browsed the menu, they inadvertently downloaded code that gave the attackers a foothold in the business’s vast computer network.

Security experts summoned to fix the problem were not allowed to disclose the details of the breach, but the lesson from the incident was clear: Companies scrambling to seal up their systems from hackers and government snoops are having to look in the unlikeliest of places for vulnerabilities. […]

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 0 notes.
thetinhouse:

By  Patrice Hutton

More than once in my own fiction, I’ve called Wichita, Kansas a dusty, grown-up cow town. There’s truth in my phrase, but also some exotifying. These days, Wichita is a city with wide streets and a Barnes & Noble spacious enough to fit multiple 747s; the once-patch of prairie is now populated with sprawling aircraft plants, megachurches, and strip malls. Those strip malls have worked their way into my fiction, likely because they overwhelm the landscape of my childhood. However, I’d also like to think it’s because Wichita taught me of their possibilities—that gems may be hidden behind those flat, sterile facades. And because one of those gems has always felt like home.
Watermark Books lives an unassuming-strip-mall existence in the heart of Wichita, blending into a landscape that grows stranger each time I come home. I’ve lived away for nine years now, having rooted myself in the mid-Atlantic, and every year, a bit of Wichita escapes me. Now, when I return, it’s flatter, its buildings are larger, and its trees are further between. On a recent trip home, my family picked me up at the airport, and we drove until we pulled into an amply-sized parking lot, as you do on every errand in Wichita. The six of us shuffled through a door covered in posters for upcoming author visits and reading series at the local university and sat down at a table, newly reunited. Flying in earlyled to a coffee craving, making a Watermark stop was a given. We caffeinated, caught up, and from time-to-time, popped up to bring a book to the table. Here I was, back at my second home, a place that’d watched me grow up.
Read More


Wonderful essay by my friend Patrice. #wichita

thetinhouse:

Wonderful essay by my friend Patrice. #wichita

This was posted 4 weeks ago. It has 7 notes. .
beatonna:

historicaltimes:

American nurses land in Normandy, 1944

ladies

beatonna:

historicaltimes:

American nurses land in Normandy, 1944

ladies

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 6,667 notes. .
beatonna:

historicaltimes:

An Royal Air Force pilot getting a haircut during a break between missions, Britain, 1942.

now this,
makes me think of this episode of QI where they talk about what accents pilots had in WWII, the idea of the Oxford Scholar RAF Pilot.

beatonna:

historicaltimes:

An Royal Air Force pilot getting a haircut during a break between missions, Britain, 1942.

now this,

makes me think of this episode of QI where they talk about what accents pilots had in WWII, the idea of the Oxford Scholar RAF Pilot.

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 3,593 notes. .
Come work at the Pew Research Center

pewresearch:

We’re hiring! See all our open positions here

Come work with awesome smart people trying to explain the world in awesome smart ways!

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 22 notes.
Other findings: Self-help might be a popular market, yet only about 20% of people who start such a book finish it. More than 80% of people who crack the pages of a mystery novel will find out who did it. People trudge through biographies at 20 pages per hour, while they read at three times that speed for erotica. And higher “acceleration factor”—or how much readers speed up as they get closer to finishing—correlates with higher average rating for a book. One of the highest acceleration factors comes from Kurt Vonnegut’s “Cat’s Cradle,” which readers start speeding through at the halfway mark, Mr. Friedman says.

What Your iPad Knows About You - WSJ

Subscription e-reader services Scribd, Oyster and Entitle track your behavior to predict your next book

This was posted 1 month ago. It has 0 notes.
Journalists know that academia holds a universe of valuable information; they just can’t find a reliable way to tap it.
Ezra Klein, The Real Reason Nobody Reads Academics
This was posted 1 month ago. It has 0 notes.
The 400-foot-tall man, as well as the 20-foot-tall pigeons, were leftover elements from gameplay features that were abandoned at an early stage of development.
Jon’s Basketball Game: Creating a sports video game has proven to be rather difficult
This was posted 1 month ago. It has 0 notes.
The six types of Twitter conversations

Have you ever wondered what a Twitter conversation looks like from 10,000 feet? A new report from the Pew Research Center, in association with the Social Media Research Foundation, provides an aerial view of the social media network. By analyzing many thousands of Twitter conversations, we identified six different conversational archetypes. Our infographic describes each type of conversation network and an explanation of how it is shaped by the topic being discussed and the people driving the conversation.

Read the full report: Mapping Twitter Topic Networks: From Polarized Crowds to Community Clusters

The six types of Twitter conversations

Have you ever wondered what a Twitter conversation looks like from 10,000 feet? A new report from the Pew Research Center, in association with the Social Media Research Foundation, provides an aerial view of the social media network. By analyzing many thousands of Twitter conversations, we identified six different conversational archetypes. Our infographic describes each type of conversation network and an explanation of how it is shaped by the topic being discussed and the people driving the conversation.

Read the full report: Mapping Twitter Topic Networks: From Polarized Crowds to Community Clusters

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 1 note. .
pewresearch:

Couples, the Internet and Social Media: Our new report is out, just in time for Valentine’s Day. 
Fully 27% of online adults who are married or in committed relationships say that the internet has had an impact on their relationships; and a majority of them say that impact has been positive. 

pewresearch:

Couples, the Internet and Social Media: Our new report is out, just in time for Valentine’s Day. 

Fully 27% of online adults who are married or in committed relationships say that the internet has had an impact on their relationships; and a majority of them say that impact has been positive. 

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 33 notes. .

Local animal rights workers say many of the strays were pets, or the offspring of pets, abandoned by families whose homes with yards were demolished over the past few years to make way for the Olympic venues and who were compensated with new apartments in taller buildings, where keeping a pet is often viewed as undesirable.

They also say that Russia has never made a priority of pushing responsible animal control policies, including spaying and neutering, which would have helped avoid the current problems.

Update on the stray dogs of Sochi — a shelter is being built, but racing against the clock.
This was posted 2 months ago. It has 1 note.
The team also noticed that certain isolated words in Twitter posts also were characteristic of depression. Words like anxiety, severe, appetite, suicidal, nausea, drowsiness, fatigue, nervousness, addictive, attacks, episodes, and sleep were used by depressed users, but more surprisingly, words like she, him, girl, game, men, home, fun, house, favorite, wants, tolerance, cope, amazing, love, care, songs, and movie could be indications of depression as well.
How Twitter Knows When You’re Depressed - TIME.com
This was posted 2 months ago. It has 0 notes.

Where people run

This was posted 2 months ago. It has 1 note.
Who Says Libraries Are Going Extinct?
This was posted 2 months ago. It has 0 notes.